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PEACE in PROGRESS

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PEACE in PROGRESS

SITUATION

PEACE IN PROGRESS

CONGO is home to the deadliest WAR since World War 2
 

This year, we see a new found stability, and there’s finally an opportunity to see PEACE in Congo. But peace takes MORE than the end of violence. Peace requires PROGRESS, of business, education, health and culture. Progress requires ENTREPRENEURS, with visionary ideas, local roots and long-term commitment. And entrepreneurs need INVESTORS: passionate, patient and with experienced knowledge.

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SOLUTION

INVEST FOR CHANGE

Falling Whistles supports CONGOLESE entrepreneurS
 

We identify and reach out to local VISIONARIES, raise money to finance their projects and offer MENTORSHIP along the whole process, from business plan to daily operation. Growth of local business leads to sustainable JOBS, financial INDEPENDENCE and greater OPPORTUNITIES for the community at large. Our mission is to build a social development fund that fuels progress towards PEACE IN CONGO

 

 

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PROJECT: INTERNET

We are financing the second in a series of INTERNET CAFÉS in Bukavu, Eastern Congo. Internet access is a CATALYST of peace, and the café becomes a HUB for learning, culture and entrepreneurship. To make this come true, we need your support. INVEST WITH US

 

OUR GOAL: $40.000



In 2008, a young traveler named Sean traveled through eastern Congo to learn about a war he knew nothing about. Just a few days later he found himself in a military encampment, where he met five boys being held prisoner by the national army. The boys had been child soldiers, taken from their homes and forced to fight for two different rebel groups, until one night they 

escaped and ran to the national army for refuge. Now in the hands of their own military, they were being treated as enemies of the state. He spent the day with the boys, trading stories, laughter and tears. One boy told him of children too small to carry guns being sent to the frontlines, armed with only a whistle. After he and his 

partner worked with the UN to have the boys released, he went home that night and wrote the Falling Whistles journal. A single story of a single day. It was originally sent to about 80 friends and family, who forwarded it around the world.
Thousands of strangers wrote back asking:
what can we do?